humani nil a me alienum puto

random rants about news, the law, healthcare law, economics and anything I find amusing

The Public and the Health Care Delivery System

The Kaiser Family Foundation, NPR and the Harvard School of Public Health recently conducted a poll of public attitudes concerning EHR, coordination of care, patient and doctor interaction around effectiveness and cost, the cost of care, the role of government and insurers in cost and comparative effectiveness, the uninsured and cost.  I found a few of the findings from the survey of note.

  • A larger portion of respondents (34%) thought that EHR’s would actually increase costs of healthcare in America than decrease (22%) it.  Even more (39%) thought it would increase their own family’s healthcare costs!
  • There is significant concern about unauthorized access (76%) to online medical records.
  • A significant minority (40%) of Americans report at least minor problems with coordinating care between their different doctors, while half say this is not a problem at all. A smaller minority (17%) say they experience “major problems” coordinating their health care services.   Interesting, those Americans who reported having personally experienced at least three ‘coordination of care’ issues are much more likely (63%) to see overtreatment in the system as a whole compared to other Americans (48%).
  • About half (49%) think that overutilization is a major problem.  Of course, only a minority (16%) say that they have received unnecessary care and a bit more than half (56%) think that insurance companies should have to cover expensive treatments even if they have not been proven more effective than other, less expensive options.
  • A significant majority of Americans  (72%) believe that there is not always clear scientific evidence about which treatment is likely to work best for any one patient.  But only a small minority (9%) say that they have received an expensive medical test or treatment in which a less expensive alternative would have been just as good.
  • A significant majority of Americans (65%) say their doctor’s charges are reasonable and (63%) believe that their doctor is working to keep the cost of their health care down.
  • There is a significant disconnect between the actual cost of insurance and what uninsured Americans are willing to spend for insurance.  Majorities report being willing to pay $25, $50 or even $100 per month for coverage, but only a minority (29%) would pay $200 per month, and only a very small minority (6%) say they would pay $400.  (Nationwide, annual premiums averaged $2,613 for single coverage and $5,799 for family plans in the 2006-2007 period).

The WSJ Health Blog commented on this survey: while patient seem to recognize that there is waste in the system, it wasn’t their physician.  She’s perfect.

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Filed under: Comparative Effectiveness Rearch, Health Law, Reform, , ,

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