humani nil a me alienum puto

random rants about news, the law, healthcare law, economics and anything I find amusing

Disturbing Paragraph of the Month

I read an article entitled “Eight Ways In-Vitro Meat will Change our Lives“, courtesy of Marginal Revolution.  (A blog that is now one of my favorites).  The article contains the most disturbing paragraph I’ve read this month. (The overall article being quite interesting).   The article discusses the emergence of in-vitro meat (mass produced, as the article describes it: “tank steak, sci fi sausage, petri pork, beaker bacon, Frankenburger, vat-grown veal, laboratory lamb, synthetic shmeat, trans-ham, factory filet, test tube tuna, cultured chicken, or any other moniker that can seduce the shopper’s stomach”).  The article goes through a number of potential implications of mass-produced, cheap IVF, including #6:

Humans are animals, so every hipster will try Cannibalism. Perhaps we’ll just eat people we don’t like, as author Iain M. Banks predicted in his short story, “The State of the Art” with diners feasting on “Stewed Idi Amin.” But I imagine passionate lovers literally eating each other, growing sausages from their co-mingled tissues overnight in tabletop appliances similar to bread-making machines.

We shall see.  (Burgers compliments of Red Robin.)

via Eight Ways In-Vitro Meat will Change Our Lives | h+ Magazine.

Filed under: Personal Posts, ,

A Picture is Worth…

I’ve given some thought to how to better visually present information since seeing a recent TED talk (post here) setting forth graphical representations of changing economic, public health and other information over time.  Here’s another great example showing the growth and decline of the British, Spanish, French and Portuguese maritime colonial empires over the 19th and 20th centuries.

Visualizing empires decline from Pedro M Cruz on Vimeo.

Filed under: Personal Posts

Health Care Reform

The one good thing about the debate thus far has been my ability to procrastinate.  Frankly, I’ve been happy that nothing definitive has passed either the House or the Senate.  Not for any particular partisan or ideological reason, but simply because once it does, I, and a lot of attorneys I know, will have a lot of primary source reading to do.   Summaries suffice until laws are passed and language must be parsed.  That time may be about here with the vote yesterday on H.R. 3962.

Recently a client, who is also taking an MBA course, asked if I had any useful information about the health care reform debate.   She wanted less highly technical materials; she wanted materials she could use to understand the debate and that were not completely uninteresting.   I told her I had a few decent links of materials I’d read over the last six months or so.  Some I’ve highlighted here.

  • This American Life.   In two programs, “More Is Less” and “Someone Else’s Money”  they spend a couple hours, in TAL’s original ‘explain it through an anecdote’ kind of way, exploring factors influencing health care inflation and how our employer driven health insurance system evolved into what it is today.   They did the programs with NPR News and specifically the Planet Money folks that helped with their amazing programs on the financial crisis — “The Great Pool of Money” and “Bad Bank.”
  • How American Health Care Killed my Father, by David Goldhill (Atlantic, September 2009).  A very readable and personalized discussion of distortions in the American healthcare system.  Final argument is that health care insurance reform should look at forcing more financial obligations on patients and move toward catastrophic coverage.   David Brooks mentioned this article in an op-ed piece he wrote.
  • The Cost Conundrum, Atul Gawande (New Yorker, June 2009).   I discuss the article here.  This is important since it was very widely discussed and it’s themes regarding variations in health care spending (many arguing as necessary to fix to “bend the curve”), has gotten a lot of attention.  I also noted a recent HHS-OIG settlement in McAllen; of interest due to my discussion.
  • Health Care Inflation Trends.  Since one major component of health care reform is ‘bending the curve’, what of health care inflation?  I pointed out one post from a blog I follow that succinctly summarizes Medicare, Medicaid projections.  I also suggest a private analysis discussing health care spending inflation and the impact on reform concluding “given that the current path of GDP and consumption appears to be sustainable for only another decade, reform of the federal health care programs and a realignment of the health care sector will occur soon.”

If I were giving to her today, I’d probably add:

 

Filed under: Health Law, Reform, , ,

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