humani nil a me alienum puto

random rants about news, the law, healthcare law, economics and anything I find amusing

Finding a Doctor Who Accepts Medicare Isn’t Easy – NYTimes.com

A New York Times article on April 1, 2009 discusses some trends: (i) a national shortage of internists, (ii) more internists and other primary care physicians refusing to accept Medicare entirely or at least new Medicare patients, and (iii) boutique/concierge  medicine.

On the first two points:

[T]he American College of Physicians, the organization for internists, estimates that by 2025 there will be 35,000 to 45,000 fewer than the population needs — and internists are increasingly unwilling to accept new Medicare patients. In a June 2008 report, the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission, an independent federal panel that advises Congress on Medicare, said that 29 percent of the Medicare beneficiaries it surveyed who were looking for a primary care doctor had a problem finding one to treat them, up from 24 percent the year before. And a 2008 survey by the Texas Medical Association found that while 58 percent of the state’s doctors took new Medicare patients, only 38 percent of primary care doctors did.

On the last point:

Another, more expensive option is concierge or “boutique” care, which comes in two forms. In the most popular kind, doctors accept Medicare and other insurance, but charge patients an annual retainer of $1,600 to $1,800 to get in the door and receive services not covered by Medicare, like annual physicals. Before signing up and paying the retainer, patients should get a written agreement spelling out which services the doctor will bill Medicare for and which the retainer covers. And always check carefully for double-billing…The other form of concierge medicine — doctors who have opted out of Medicare — is more expensive still. Fees range as high as $15,000 a year and cover office visits, access to the doctor when care is needed, referrals to specialists and thorough annual physicals…Dr. Knope, the author of “Concierge Medicine: A New System to Get the Best Healthcare,” has this kind of practice in Tucson. His patients sign a contract agreeing to pay $6,000 a year for individuals and $10,000 a year for couples. The fee covers office visits, physical exams and phone consultations, and Dr. Knope will meet patients in the emergency room, see them in the hospital and occasionally make house calls…A list of about 500 concierge doctors throughout the country is available on Dr. Knope’s Web site, http://www.conciergemedicinemd.com.

via Finding a Doctor Who Accepts Medicare Isn’t Easy – NYTimes.com.

Filed under: CMP, Concierge Medicine, Health Law, Medicare, Payment, Primary Care, Reform, , , ,

The Health Care Blog: “Mr. Obama, Tear Down These (Hospital) Walls”

On the Healthcare Blog, Rober Wachter analyzes the recent NEJM report on hospital readmissions, the related

[T]he DRG system created a big black hole, and it is time to fill it. It’s called the post-discharge period. And one large part of the detritus emerging from that hole is readmissions. You probably saw this week’s NEJM study by Stephen Jencks (a former Medicare official and now a Baltimore-based consultant), and my pals Mark Williams and Eric Coleman, of Northwestern and Colorado, respectively. The study found that 20% of Medicare patients are readmitted within a month of discharge, and one-third return within 90 days. Even more remarkably, by a year out more than half of patients (56%) discharged from an acute care hospital are re-hospitalized. The authors estimate that the cost of preventable readmissions was $17 billion in 2004 (the study year), which would make it more like $25 billion today.

via The Health Care Blog: “Mr. Obama, Tear Down These (Hospital) Walls”.

Wachter also summarizes some interesting points of the study:

Like so many things in healthcare, there was striking geographic variation in readmission rates – from a low of 13% in Idaho to 23% in Washington, D.C.

There were also variations by DRG, with the highest readmission rates in patients with heart failure, psychosis, vascular and cardiac surgery, and COPD – pointing the way toward targeted interventions.

More than half the patients readmitted within 30 days appeared not to have had an outpatient visit between hospital discharge and readmission, perhaps another target for intervention.

Most (70%) surgical patients who are readmitted come back for a medical diagnosis such as pneumonia or UTI.

Approximately 30% of readmitted patients come back to a different hospital, so hospitals will underestimate the extent of their readmission problem by looking solely at their own bounce-backs.

via The Health Care Blog: “Mr. Obama, Tear Down These (Hospital) Walls”.

Wachter continues and and discusses why this is becoming critical (healthcare reform/savings dollars) and the health system’s current state as it relates to discharge planning/readmissions:

The Obama budget plan depends on figuring this out. The budget, which aims to save $300 billion (which used to seem like a lot of money) in Medicare/Medicaid costs over the next decade, includes a projected $26 billion in savings from “driving down hospital readmission rates for Medicare patients” …The manifestations of this myopic focus on hospitalization as the unit of analysis can be seen in the paucity of attention that hospitals give post-discharge care. Studies have chronicled a litany of post-discharge disasters…In other words, when it comes to post-discharge care, we suck…Despite powerful literature that shows that simple interventions – like post-discharge phone calls or the use of a transitions coach – can lead to impressive improvements in post-discharge care and decreased readmission and return-to-ED rates, few hospitals have put these interventions in place.

Wacther then makes an observation concerning financial efforts to address the system’s performance in this area:

Harvard’s Arnie Epstein reviews the policy initiatives addressing readmissions – including those that are here today (publishing readmission rates on the Web) and those being actively discussed (financial penalties to hospitals with high readmission rates). But the Cool Kid on the Payment Block is “bundling” – aggregating  payments for doctors and hospitals for a period of time after an illness (an “episode of care”) in an effort to create accountable integrated entities that will improve care across the continuum (the entities somehow have to split up the spoils between hospitals, hospitalists, SNFs, primary care docs, specialists, care coordinators… Have fun with that). Epstein’s verdict: worthy of pilot studies, but “the likelihood that [bundling] will prove to be a successful model is still uncertain.”

He recognizes the challenges, and the laments, of hospitals, that have difficulties in controlling other healthcare provider’s post-discharge data.  Why, hospitals ask, can you hold us responsible if we are not in control of this.

I would also put on the table that if the government goes this route, query if it makes any sense to maintain Medicare CoP restrictions on promotion of hospital/health system owned and controlled providers — such as those exist for home health.

He observes that there are tools ready out there to assist hospitals in this area, including those developed through the Society of Hospital Medicine and its “splendid” Project Boost.

Finally, he observes that “I, like you, don’t know where the money will come from for all of this.”   I tend to disagree.  I pretty much know where (most of) the money will come from — where the largest portion of the Medicare premium dollar comes from — inpatient admissions.   Get ready!

Filed under: Comparative Effectiveness Rearch, Health Law, Medicare, Payment, Quality Reporting, Reform, Risk Management, , , ,

Hospital Doors Revolve for Many Medicare Patients – Health Blog – WSJ

The WSJ Health Blog reports on April 2, 2009 that MEDPAC is recommending restructuring hospital payments in a “bundle” to incentive hospitals to minimize readmissions of Medicare patients.  We’ll see how this plays out, but I can certain envision greater integration of bundled prospective payments for, at least, certain types of admissions.

Some 20% of Medicare patients discharged from the hospital are readmitted within a month, and 34% return within three months, according to a study published in the current New England Journal of Medicine. Unplanned rehospitalizations cost Medicare $17.4 billion in 2004, the study says…MedPac, a commission that advises Congress on Medicare policy, has recommended that Medicare start a pilot program in which “bundled” payments extend beyond the first hospital stay to include, say, the first 30 days after discharge. The idea, which is also part of President Obama’s budget proposal, is that if hospitals get paid fixed rates for caring for certain conditions — and they don’t get paid more for those same conditions if patients return — hospitals will have a financial incentive to reduce the risk of readmission.

via Hospital Doors Revolve for Many Medicare Patients – Health Blog – WSJ.

Filed under: Comparative Effectiveness Rearch, Health Law, Medicaid, Medicare, Payment, Quality Reporting, Reform, , , ,

Pages

August 2017
M T W T F S S
« Oct    
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031  

HealthCounsel Tweets